About Acupuncture #01

What is Acupuncture?

Traditional Acupuncture as been used in China and Japan for over 3000 years. It is a widely used healing system throughout the world.

Acupuncture is based on the idea that energy flows around the body and nourishes it, much like a river flows and nourishes the land. This vital energy is called Qi (chi)


Qi consists of equal and opposite qualities - Yin and Yang - and when these become unbalanced, illness may result. By inserting fine needles into the channels of energy, an acupuncturist can stimulate the body's own healing response and help restore its natural balance. The flow of Qi can be disturbed by a number of factors. These include emotional states such as anxiety, stress, anger, fear or grief, poor nutrition, weather conditions, hereditary factors, infections, poisons and trauma. The principal aim of acupuncture in treating the whole person is to recover the equilibrium between the physical, emotional and spiritual aspects of the individual.



Modern Scientific methods have shown Acupuncture to be effective for many different conditions.

Treatment Methods

Chinese medicine uses more treatment methods than just needling. All these methods are different ways of influencing the movement and the quality of the Qi. The choice of treatment depends on the diagnosis of your condition from a Chinese Medical perspective.
About Acupuncture #02

Needling

Acupuncture Needles directly access the channels of Qi that run superficially around the body. Sometimes you can feel the result of the manipulation of the energy immediately, most commonly this can present as a feeling of calmness or relaxation. Needles may be inserted then immediately taken out, or they may be left in for as long as 20 minutes depending on the condition.

Practitioners of Five Element Acupuncture try to use as few needles as possible within a treatment and the needle technique used is as light as possible.
About Acupuncture #03

Moxibustion

Moxibustion is the burning of the herb 'mugwort' either directly on the skin or by using a moxa stick held over the skin. However it does not burn the patients skin it is used to warm the Qi and to get the energy moving more efficiently. It is particularly good for people who always feel the cold and is often used in Winter
About Acupuncture #04

Cupping

Cupping uses suction to stimulate the Qi at certain acupuncture points or sites of pain. It is particularly good for back pain and for common conditions such as colds and coughs, and other viral infections. It is very effective when used with children having the advantage of being non invasive. The main side effect of cupping is bruising, although the treatment itself is not painful, the suction can sometimes create a circular bruise.

Gua Sha

Gua Sha is a very ancient form of folk medicine still practiced in parts of Asia. It involves scraping the skin with a smooth edged object. I use a chinese ceramic soup spoon, in China coins are often used for this practice.

This is basically a type of deep tissue massage designed expel heat and stagnation from the muscles. Within Chinese Medicine heat is thought of as a cause of disease.

This treatment is very effective for musculoskeletal problems, tight neck and shoulders from stress and for headaches that are related to such muscle tension. Arthritic pain can also be alleviated with Gua Sha.

Children respond particularly well to this simple treatment and often I show parents how to use this treatment for children with anxiety, hyperactivity or sleep problems.

It is also effective for alleviating colds and viral infections, especially if done when the first symptoms start to arise.